Wikipedia:Template index/Cleanup

  • template messages may be added to articles needing a cleanup. their purposes are to foster improvement of the encyclopedia by alerting editors to changes that need to be made. cleanup tags are meant to be temporary notices that lead to an effort to fix the problem, not a permanent badge of shame to show that you disagree with an article, or a method of warning readers about an article.

    unless otherwise noted, cleanup messages, or tags, should be placed at the top of the page, before other templates, images, or infoboxes, but after hatnotes (see wikipedia:hatnote § placement). certain tags can be placed at the beginning of an individual section, and others can be placed within the text itself (inline).

    a date parameter is added by a bot, or you can add it yourself with |date=april 2020.

    don't tag an article if you can easily and confidently fix the problem.
    your goal is an improved article, not a tagged article.
    do some research to attempt to solve the problem before tagging.
    don't put the burden of doing so on another editor if you are capable of fixing the problem yourself with a simple search or consulting a reference work.
    don't do "drive-by" tagging.
    tags must either be accompanied by a comment on the article's talk page explaining the problem and beginning a discussion on how to fix it or, for simpler and more obvious problems, a remark using the reason parameter (available in some templates) as shown below. at the very least, tagging editors must be willing to follow through with substantive discussion.
    don’t insert tags that are similar or redundant.
    for example, most articles that read like essays have an inappropriate tone, and in fact they end up being automatically grouped in the same category, so it is unnecessary to tag with both {{tone}} and {{essay-like}}.
    if an article has many problems, tag only the highest priority issues.
    a lengthy list is often less helpful than a shorter one (see also: tag bombing and over-tagging).
    don't add tags for trivial or minor problems, especially if an article needs a lot of work.
    for example, there is little point in noting grammatical problems for a section that needs to be completely re-written to comply with content policies. focus on the biggest one, two, or three problems.
  • does the article meet inclusion requirements?
  • best practices in obscure or unpopular articles
  • best practices in heavily monitored articles
  • use in sections
  • tag consolidation
  • cleanup
  • other article tags
  • open tasks
  • see also

Template messages may be added to articles needing a cleanup. Their purposes are to foster improvement of the encyclopedia by alerting editors to changes that need to be made. Cleanup tags are meant to be temporary notices that lead to an effort to fix the problem, not a permanent badge of shame to show that you disagree with an article, or a method of warning readers about an article.

Unless otherwise noted, cleanup messages, or tags, should be placed at the top of the page, before other templates, images, or infoboxes, but after hatnotes (see Wikipedia:Hatnote § Placement). Certain tags can be placed at the beginning of an individual section, and others can be placed within the text itself (inline).

A date parameter is added by a bot, or you can add it yourself with |date=April 2020.

Don't tag an article if you can easily and confidently fix the problem.
Your goal is an improved article, not a tagged article.
Do some research to attempt to solve the problem before tagging.
Don't put the burden of doing so on another editor if you are capable of fixing the problem yourself with a simple search or consulting a reference work.
Don't do "drive-by" tagging.
Tags must either be accompanied by a comment on the article's talk page explaining the problem and beginning a discussion on how to fix it or, for simpler and more obvious problems, a remark using the reason parameter (available in some templates) as shown below. At the very least, tagging editors must be willing to follow through with substantive discussion.
Don’t insert tags that are similar or redundant.
For example, most articles that read like essays have an inappropriate tone, and in fact they end up being automatically grouped in the same category, so it is unnecessary to tag with both {{tone}} and {{essay-like}}.
If an article has many problems, tag only the highest priority issues.
A lengthy list is often less helpful than a shorter one (See also: tag bombing and over-tagging).
Don't add tags for trivial or minor problems, especially if an article needs a lot of work.
For example, there is little point in noting grammatical problems for a section that needs to be completely re-written to comply with content policies. Focus on the biggest one, two, or three problems.