Vandalic language

  • vandalic
    native tospain, north africa
    extinct6th century ad
    language family
    indo-european
    • germanic
      • east germanic (?)
        • vandalic
    language codes
    iso 639-3xvn
    xvn
    vand1245[1]
    the vandals during the migration period.

    vandalic was the germanic language spoken by the vandals during roughly the 3rd to 6th centuries. it was probably closely related to gothic, and as such is traditionally classified as an east germanic language. its attestation is very fragmentary, mainly due to vandals' constant migrations and late adoption of writing. all modern sources from the time when vandalic was spoken are protohistoric.

    the vandals, hasdingi and silingi established themselves in gallaecia (northern portugal and galicia) and in southern spain, following other germanic and non-germanic peoples (visigoths, alans and suebi) in c. 410 before they moved to north africa in the 430s. their kingdom flourished in the early 6th century, but after their defeat in 536 they were placed under byzantine administration and their language likely disappeared before the end of the century.

  • attestation
  • grammar
  • see also
  • references

Vandalic
Native toSpain, North Africa
Extinct6th century AD
Language codes
ISO 639-3xvn
vand1245[1]
The Vandals during the Migration period.

Vandalic was the Germanic language spoken by the Vandals during roughly the 3rd to 6th centuries. It was probably closely related to Gothic, and as such is traditionally classified as an East Germanic language. Its attestation is very fragmentary, mainly due to Vandals' constant migrations and late adoption of writing. All modern sources from the time when Vandalic was spoken are protohistoric.

The Vandals, Hasdingi and Silingi established themselves in Gallaecia (northern Portugal and Galicia) and in southern Spain, following other Germanic and non-Germanic peoples (Visigoths, Alans and Suebi) in c. 410 before they moved to North Africa in the 430s. Their kingdom flourished in the early 6th century, but after their defeat in 536 they were placed under Byzantine administration and their language likely disappeared before the end of the century.