Spanish Constitution of 1812

  • constitution of cádiz
    an original copy of the constitution
    original version of the constitution kept in the senate of spain
    cortes of cádiz
    territorial extent spanish empire
    passed19 march 1812
    enacted12 march 1812
    signed bypresident of the cortes of cádiz
    174 deputies
    4 secretaries
    effective19 march 1812 (first time)
    1 january 1820 (second time, de facto)
    1836 (third time, de facto)
    repealed4 may 1814 (first time)
    april 1823 (second time)
    18 june 1837 (third time)

    the political constitution of the spanish monarchy (spanish: constitución política de la monarquía española), also known as the constitution of cádiz (spanish: constitución de cádiz) and as la pepa,[1] was the first constitution of spain and one of the earliest constitutions in world history.[2] it was established on 19 march 1812 by the cortes of cádiz, the first spanish legislature. with the notable exception of proclaiming roman catholicism as the official and sole legal religion in spain, the constitution was one of the most liberal of its time: it affirmed national sovereignty, separation of powers, freedom of the press, free enterprise, abolished feudalism, and established a constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary system. it was one of the first constitutions that allowed universal male suffrage, through a complex indirect electoral system.[3] it was repealed by king ferdinand vii in 1814 in valencia, who re-established absolute monarchy.

    however, the constitution had many difficulties becoming fully effective: much of spain was ruled by the french, while the rest of the country was in the hands of interim junta governments focused on resistance to the bonapartes rather than on the immediate establishment of a constitutional regime. many of the overseas territories did not recognize the legitimacy of these interim metropolitan governments, leading to a power vacuum and the establishment of separate juntas on the american continent. on 24 march 1814, six weeks after returning to spain, ferdinand vii abolished the constitution. the constitution was reinstated during the trienio liberal (1820–1823), and again briefly 1836—1837 while the progressives prepared the constitution of 1837.

  • background
  • deliberations and reforms
  • repeal and restoration
  • see also
  • bibliography
  • references

Constitution of Cádiz
An original copy of the Constitution
Original version of the Constitution kept in the Senate of Spain
Cortes of Cádiz
Territorial extent Spanish Empire
Passed19 March 1812
Enacted12 March 1812
Signed byPresident of the Cortes of Cádiz
174 deputies
4 secretaries
Effective19 March 1812 (first time)
1 January 1820 (second time, de facto)
1836 (third time, de facto)
Repealed4 May 1814 (first time)
April 1823 (second time)
18 June 1837 (third time)

The Political Constitution of the Spanish Monarchy (Spanish: Constitución Política de la Monarquía Española), also known as the Constitution of Cádiz (Spanish: Constitución de Cádiz) and as La Pepa,[1] was the first Constitution of Spain and one of the earliest constitutions in world history.[2] It was established on 19 March 1812 by the Cortes of Cádiz, the first Spanish legislature. With the notable exception of proclaiming Roman Catholicism as the official and sole legal religion in Spain, the constitution was one of the most liberal of its time: it affirmed national sovereignty, separation of powers, freedom of the press, free enterprise, abolished feudalism, and established a constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary system. It was one of the first constitutions that allowed universal male suffrage, through a complex indirect electoral system.[3] It was repealed by King Ferdinand VII in 1814 in Valencia, who re-established absolute monarchy.

However, the Constitution had many difficulties becoming fully effective: much of Spain was ruled by the French, while the rest of the country was in the hands of interim Junta governments focused on resistance to the Bonapartes rather than on the immediate establishment of a constitutional regime. Many of the overseas territories did not recognize the legitimacy of these interim metropolitan governments, leading to a power vacuum and the establishment of separate juntas on the American continent. On 24 March 1814, six weeks after returning to Spain, Ferdinand VII abolished the constitution. The constitution was reinstated during the Trienio Liberal (1820–1823), and again briefly 1836—1837 while the Progressives prepared the Constitution of 1837.