Representative democracy

  • representative democracy also indirect democracy, representative government or is a type of democracy founded on the principle of elected officials representing a group of people, as opposed to direct democracy.[1] nearly all modern western-style democracies are types of representative democracies; for example, the united kingdom is a unitary parliamentary constitutional monarchy, france is a unitary semi-presidential republic, and the united states is a federal presidential republic.[2]

    it is an element of both the parliamentary and the presidential systems of government and is typically used in a lower chamber such as the house of commons of the united kingdom, lok sabha of india, and may be curtailed by constitutional constraints such as an upper chamber. it has been described by some political theorists including robert a. dahl, gregory houston and ian liebenberg as polyarchy.[3][4] in it the power is in the hands of the representatives who are elected by the people. political parties are often central to this form of democracy because electoral systems require voters to vote for political parties as opposed to individual representatives.[5]

  • powers of representatives
  • history
  • research on representation per se
  • criticisms
  • references
  • external links

Representative democracy also indirect democracy, representative government or is a type of democracy founded on the principle of elected officials representing a group of people, as opposed to direct democracy.[1] Nearly all modern Western-style democracies are types of representative democracies; for example, the United Kingdom is a unitary parliamentary constitutional monarchy, France is a unitary semi-presidential republic, and the United States is a federal presidential republic.[2]

It is an element of both the parliamentary and the presidential systems of government and is typically used in a lower chamber such as the House of Commons of the United Kingdom, Lok Sabha of India, and may be curtailed by constitutional constraints such as an upper chamber. It has been described by some political theorists including Robert A. Dahl, Gregory Houston and Ian Liebenberg as polyarchy.[3][4] In it the power is in the hands of the representatives who are elected by the people. Political parties are often central to this form of democracy because electoral systems require voters to vote for political parties as opposed to individual representatives.[5]