Reformation

  • the reformation (alternatively named the protestant reformation or the european reformation[1]) was a movement within western christianity in 16th-century europe that posed a religious and political challenge to the roman catholic church and papal authority in particular. although the reformation is usually considered to have started with the publication of the ninety-five theses by martin luther in 1517, there was no schism between the catholic church and the nascent luther until the 1521 edict of worms. the edict condemned luther and officially banned citizens of the holy roman empire from defending or propagating his ideas.[2] the end of the reformation era is disputed: it could be considered to end with the enactment of the confessions of faith which began the age of orthodoxy.[definition needed] other suggested ending years relate to the counter-reformation or the peace of westphalia. from a catholic perspective, the second vatican council called for an end to the counter-reformation.[3]

  • overview
  • origins and early history
  • reformation in germany
  • reformation outside germany
  • spread
  • conclusion and legacy
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

The Reformation (alternatively named the Protestant Reformation or the European Reformation[1]) was a movement within Western Christianity in 16th-century Europe that posed a religious and political challenge to the Roman Catholic Church and papal authority in particular. Although the Reformation is usually considered to have started with the publication of the Ninety-five Theses by Martin Luther in 1517, there was no schism between the Catholic Church and the nascent Luther until the 1521 Edict of Worms. The edict condemned Luther and officially banned citizens of the Holy Roman Empire from defending or propagating his ideas.[2] The end of the Reformation era is disputed: it could be considered to end with the enactment of the confessions of faith which began the Age of Orthodoxy.[definition needed] Other suggested ending years relate to the Counter-Reformation or the Peace of Westphalia. From a Catholic perspective, the Second Vatican Council called for an end to the Counter-Reformation.[3]