Princeton Theological Seminary

  • princeton theological seminary
    princeton theological seminary seal.svg
    typeseminary
    established1812
    affiliationpresbyterian church (usa)
    endowment$1.127 billion (2019)[1]
    presidentm. craig barnes
    academic staff
    43
    students365
    location
    princeton
    ,
    new jersey
    ,
    united states
    campuswww.ptsem.edu

    princeton theological seminary (pts) is a private presbyterian school of theology in princeton, new jersey. founded in 1812 under the auspices of archibald alexander, the general assembly of the presbyterian church, and the college of new jersey (now princeton university), it is the second-oldest seminary in the united states.[2][3] it is also the largest of ten seminaries associated with the presbyterian church.

    princeton seminary has long been influential in theological studies, with many leading biblical scholars, theologians, and clergy among its faculty and alumni. in addition, it operates one of the largest theological libraries in the world and maintains a number of special collections, including the karl barth research collection in the center for barth studies. the seminary also manages an endowment of $1.13 billion,[4]making it the third-wealthiest institution of higher learning in the state of new jersey—after princeton university and rutgers university.[5]

    today, princeton seminary enrolls approximately 500 students. while around 40 percent of them are candidates for ministry specifically in the presbyterian church, the majority are completing such candidature in other denominations, pursuing careers in academia across a number of different disciplines, or receiving training for other, non-theological fields altogether.[6][7]

    seminarians hold academic reciprocity with princeton university as well as the westminster choir college of rider university, new brunswick theological seminary, jewish theological seminary, and the school of social work at rutgers university. the institution also has an ongoing relationship with the center of theological inquiry.[8]

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Princeton Theological Seminary
Princeton Theological Seminary seal.svg
TypeSeminary
Established1812
AffiliationPresbyterian Church (USA)
Endowment$1.127 billion (2019)[1]
PresidentM. Craig Barnes
Academic staff
43
Students365
Location, ,
United States
Campuswww.ptsem.edu

Princeton Theological Seminary (PTS) is a private Presbyterian school of theology in Princeton, New Jersey. Founded in 1812 under the auspices of Archibald Alexander, the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church, and the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), it is the second-oldest seminary in the United States.[2][3] It is also the largest of ten seminaries associated with the Presbyterian Church.

Princeton Seminary has long been influential in theological studies, with many leading biblical scholars, theologians, and clergy among its faculty and alumni. In addition, it operates one of the largest theological libraries in the world and maintains a number of special collections, including the Karl Barth Research Collection in the Center for Barth Studies. The seminary also manages an endowment of $1.13 billion,[4]making it the third-wealthiest institution of higher learning in the state of New Jersey—after Princeton University and Rutgers University.[5]

Today, Princeton Seminary enrolls approximately 500 students. While around 40 percent of them are candidates for ministry specifically in the Presbyterian Church, the majority are completing such candidature in other denominations, pursuing careers in academia across a number of different disciplines, or receiving training for other, non-theological fields altogether.[6][7]

Seminarians hold academic reciprocity with Princeton University as well as the Westminster Choir College of Rider University, New Brunswick Theological Seminary, Jewish Theological Seminary, and the School of Social Work at Rutgers University. The institution also has an ongoing relationship with the Center of Theological Inquiry.[8]