Picea abies

  • norway spruce
    kuusi.jpg
    conservation status

    least concern (iucn 3.1)[1]
    scientific classification edit
    kingdom: plantae
    clade: tracheophytes
    division: pinophyta
    class: pinopsida
    order: pinales
    family: pinaceae
    genus: picea
    species:
    p. abies
    binomial name
    picea abies
    (l.) h. karst.
    norway spruce picea abies distribution map 2.png
    the norway spruce range.[2]
    picea abies range.svg
    distribution map. green: native range. orange: introduced areas. crosses and triangles denote isolated populations.

    picea abies, the norway spruce[3] or european spruce,[4] is a species of spruce native to northern, central and eastern europe.[5] it has branchlets that typically hang downwards, and the largest cones of any spruce, 9–17 cm (3 126 34 in) long. it is very closely related to the siberian spruce (picea obovata), which replaces it east of the ural mountains, and with which it hybridises freely. the norway spruce is widely planted for its wood, and is the species used as the main christmas tree in several cities around the world. it was the first gymnosperm to have its genome sequenced, and one clone has been measured as 9,560 years old.

    the latin specific epithet abies means “fir-like”.[6]

  • description
  • range and ecology
  • taxonomy
  • cultivation
  • longevity
  • genetics
  • chemistry
  • research
  • synonyms
  • see also
  • references
  • external links

Norway spruce
Kuusi.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Division: Pinophyta
Class: Pinopsida
Order: Pinales
Family: Pinaceae
Genus: Picea
Species:
P. abies
Binomial name
Picea abies
Norway Spruce Picea abies distribution map 2.png
The Norway spruce range.[2]
Picea abies range.svg
Distribution map. Green: native range. Orange: introduced areas. Crosses and triangles denote isolated populations.

Picea abies, the Norway spruce[3] or European spruce,[4] is a species of spruce native to Northern, Central and Eastern Europe.[5] It has branchlets that typically hang downwards, and the largest cones of any spruce, 9–17 cm (3 126 34 in) long. It is very closely related to the Siberian spruce (Picea obovata), which replaces it east of the Ural Mountains, and with which it hybridises freely. The Norway spruce is widely planted for its wood, and is the species used as the main Christmas tree in several cities around the world. It was the first gymnosperm to have its genome sequenced, and one clone has been measured as 9,560 years old.

The Latin specific epithet abies means “fir-like”.[6]