Law and Gospel

  • in protestant christianity, the relationship between law and gospelgod's law and the gospel of jesus christ—is a major topic in lutheran and reformed theology. in these religious traditions, the distinction between the doctrines of law, which demands obedience to god's ethical will, and gospel, which promises the forgiveness of sins in light of the person and work of jesus christ, is critical. ministers use it as a hermeneutical principle of biblical interpretation and as a guiding principle in homiletics (sermon composition) and pastoral care. it involves the supersession of the old covenant (including traditional jewish law, or halakha) by the new covenant and christian theology.

    other christian groups have a view on the issue as well, or more generally views of the old covenant, though the matter has not usually been as hotly debated or rigorously defined as in the lutheran and reformed traditions.

    sometimes the issue is discussed under the headings of "law and grace", "sin and grace", "spirit and letter", and "ministry (διακονíα, diakonia) of death/condemnation" and "ministry of the spirit/righteousness".[1]

  • lutheran view
  • reformed view
  • lutheran and reformed differences
  • methodist view
  • imperative and indicative
  • see also
  • notes
  • further reading
  • external links

In Protestant Christianity, the relationship between Law and GospelGod's Law and the Gospel of Jesus Christ—is a major topic in Lutheran and Reformed theology. In these religious traditions, the distinction between the doctrines of Law, which demands obedience to God's ethical will, and Gospel, which promises the forgiveness of sins in light of the person and work of Jesus Christ, is critical. Ministers use it as a hermeneutical principle of biblical interpretation and as a guiding principle in homiletics (sermon composition) and pastoral care. It involves the supersession of the Old Covenant (including traditional Jewish law, or halakha) by the New Covenant and Christian theology.

Other Christian groups have a view on the issue as well, or more generally views of the Old Covenant, though the matter has not usually been as hotly debated or rigorously defined as in the Lutheran and Reformed traditions.

Sometimes the issue is discussed under the headings of "Law and Grace", "Sin and Grace", "Spirit and Letter", and "ministry (διακονíα, diakonia) of death/condemnation" and "ministry of the Spirit/righteousness".[1]