Ladin language

  • ladin
    lingaz ladin, ladin
    ladin2 k.jpg
    native toitalydolomite mountains, non valley
    regiontrentino-south tyrol
    veneto
    native speakers
    41,129 (2006[1] - 2011[2][3])
    language family
    indo-european
    • italic
      • romance
        • western
          • gallo-romance
            • rhaeto-romance
              • ladin
    dialects
    • cadorino
    • nones
    • fornes
    • etc.
    official status
    ladin cultural centre majon di fascegn
    istitut ladin micurà de rü
    istituto ladin de la dolomites
    language codes
    iso 639-3lld
    ladi1250[4]
    linguasphere51-aaa-l
    this article contains ipa phonetic symbols. without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of unicode characters. for an introductory guide on ipa symbols, see help:ipa.
    languages of
    south tyrol.
    majorities per municipality in 2011:
    language distribution in south tyrol, italy 2011, en.png
    languages of
    trentino.
    percentage per municipality in 2011:
    language distribution trentino 2011.png
    languages of
    the province of belluno.
    recognized ladin area
    lingua ladina in provincia di belluno.svg

    ladin (n/,[5][6] also uk: n/;[7] autonym: ladin, italian: ladino; german: ladinisch) is a romance language consisting of a group of dialects that some consider part of a unitary rhaeto-romance language, mainly spoken in the dolomite mountains in northern italy in the provinces of south tyrol, trentino, and belluno, by the ladin people. it exhibits similarities to swiss romansh and friulian.

    the precise extension of the ladin language area is the subject of scholarly debates. a more narrow perspective includes only the dialects of the valleys around the sella group, while wider definitions comprise the dialects of adjacent valleys in the province of belluno and even dialects spoken in the northwestern trentino.[8][9]

    a standard written variety of ladin (ladin dolomitan) has been developed by the office for ladin language planning as a common communication tool across the whole ladin-speaking region,[10] but it is not popular among ladin speakers.

    ladin should not be confused with ladino (i.e., judeo-spanish), which, although also romance, is derived from old spanish.

  • geographic distribution
  • history
  • status
  • subdivisions
  • sample texts
  • phonology
  • see also
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

Ladin
lingaz ladin, ladin
Ladin2 K.jpg
Native toItalyDolomite Mountains, Non Valley
RegionTrentino-South Tyrol
Veneto
Native speakers
41,129 (2006[1] - 2011[2][3])
Dialects
Official status
Ladin Cultural Centre Majon di Fascegn
Istitut Ladin Micurà de Rü
Istituto Ladin de la Dolomites
Language codes
ISO 639-3lld
ladi1250[4]
Linguasphere51-AAA-l
This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.
Languages of
South Tyrol.
Majorities per municipality in 2011:
Language distribution in South Tyrol, Italy 2011, en.png
Languages of
Trentino.
Percentage per municipality in 2011:
Language distribution Trentino 2011.png
Languages of
the Province of Belluno.
Recognized Ladin area
Lingua ladina in provincia di Belluno.svg

Ladin (n/,[5][6] also UK: n/;[7] autonym: ladin, Italian: ladino; German: Ladinisch) is a Romance language consisting of a group of dialects that some consider part of a unitary Rhaeto-Romance language, mainly spoken in the Dolomite Mountains in Northern Italy in the provinces of South Tyrol, Trentino, and Belluno, by the Ladin people. It exhibits similarities to Swiss Romansh and Friulian.

The precise extension of the Ladin language area is the subject of scholarly debates. A more narrow perspective includes only the dialects of the valleys around the Sella group, while wider definitions comprise the dialects of adjacent valleys in the Province of Belluno and even dialects spoken in the northwestern Trentino.[8][9]

A standard written variety of Ladin (Ladin Dolomitan) has been developed by the Office for Ladin Language Planning as a common communication tool across the whole Ladin-speaking region,[10] but it is not popular among Ladin speakers.

Ladin should not be confused with Ladino (i.e., Judeo-Spanish), which, although also Romance, is derived from Old Spanish.