Greek alphabet

  • greek alphabet
    greekalphabet.svg
    type
    alphabet
    languagesgreek

    official script in:

    • greece
    • cyprus
    • european union
    time period
    c. 800 bc – present[1][2]
    parent systems
    egyptian hieroglyphs
    • proto-sinaitic alphabet
      • phoenician alphabet
        • greek alphabet
    child systems
    • gothic
    • glagolitic
    • cyrillic
    • coptic
    • armenian
    • old italic
    • latin
    • georgian
    directionleft-to-right
    iso 15924grek, 200
    unicode alias
    greek
    u+1f00–u+1fff greek extended

    the greek alphabet has been used to write the greek language since the late ninth or early eighth century bc.[3][4] it is derived from the earlier phoenician alphabet,[5] and was the first alphabetic script in history to have distinct letters for vowels as well as consonants. in archaic and early classical times, the greek alphabet existed in many different local variants, but, by the end of the fourth century bc, the euclidean alphabet, with twenty-four letters, ordered from alpha to omega, had become standard and it is this version that is still used to write greek today. these twenty-four letters (each in uppercase and lowercase forms) are: Α α, Β β, Γ γ, Δ δ, Ε ε, Ζ ζ, Η η, Θ θ, Ι ι, Κ κ, Λ λ, Μ μ, Ν ν, Ξ ξ, Ο ο, Π π, Ρ ρ, Σ σ/ς, Τ τ, Υ υ, Φ φ, Χ χ, Ψ ψ, and Ω ω.

    the greek alphabet is the ancestor of the latin and cyrillic scripts.[6] like latin and cyrillic, greek originally had only a single form of each letter; it developed the letter case distinction between uppercase and lowercase in parallel with latin during the modern era. sound values and conventional transcriptions for some of the letters differ between ancient and modern greek usage, because the pronunciation of greek has changed significantly between the fifth century bc and today. modern and ancient greek also use different diacritics. apart from its use in writing the greek language, in both its ancient and its modern forms, the greek alphabet today also serves as a source of technical symbols and labels in many domains of mathematics, science and other fields.

  • letters
  • history
  • derived alphabets
  • other uses
  • glyph variants
  • computer encodings
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • bibliography
  • external links

Greek alphabet
Greekalphabet.svg
Type
LanguagesGreek

Official script in:

Time period
c. 800 BC – present[1][2]
Parent systems
Child systems
DirectionLeft-to-right
ISO 15924Grek, 200
Unicode alias
Greek
U+1F00–U+1FFF Greek Extended

The Greek alphabet has been used to write the Greek language since the late ninth or early eighth century BC.[3][4] It is derived from the earlier Phoenician alphabet,[5] and was the first alphabetic script in history to have distinct letters for vowels as well as consonants. In Archaic and early Classical times, the Greek alphabet existed in many different local variants, but, by the end of the fourth century BC, the Euclidean alphabet, with twenty-four letters, ordered from alpha to omega, had become standard and it is this version that is still used to write Greek today. These twenty-four letters (each in uppercase and lowercase forms) are: Α α, Β β, Γ γ, Δ δ, Ε ε, Ζ ζ, Η η, Θ θ, Ι ι, Κ κ, Λ λ, Μ μ, Ν ν, Ξ ξ, Ο ο, Π π, Ρ ρ, Σ σ/ς, Τ τ, Υ υ, Φ φ, Χ χ, Ψ ψ, and Ω ω.

The Greek alphabet is the ancestor of the Latin and Cyrillic scripts.[6] Like Latin and Cyrillic, Greek originally had only a single form of each letter; it developed the letter case distinction between uppercase and lowercase in parallel with Latin during the modern era. Sound values and conventional transcriptions for some of the letters differ between Ancient and Modern Greek usage, because the pronunciation of Greek has changed significantly between the fifth century BC and today. Modern and Ancient Greek also use different diacritics. Apart from its use in writing the Greek language, in both its ancient and its modern forms, the Greek alphabet today also serves as a source of technical symbols and labels in many domains of mathematics, science and other fields.