Global governance

  • global governance or world governance is a movement towards political cooperation among transnational actors, aimed at negotiating responses to problems that affect more than one state or region. institutions of global governance—the united nations, the international criminal court, the world bank, etc.—tend to have limited or demarcated global governance involves multiple states including international organizations with one state having more of a lead role than the rest. the modern question of world governance exists in the context of globalization and globalizing regimes of power: politically, economically and culturally. in response to the acceleration of worldwide interdependence, both between human societies and between humankind and the biosphere, the term "global governance" may name the process of designating laws, rules, or regulations intended for a global scale.

    global governance is not a singular system. there is no "world government" but the many different regimes of global governance do have commonalities:

    while the contemporary system of global political relations is not integrated, the relation between the various regimes of global governance is not insignificant, and the system does have a common dominant organizational form. the dominant mode of organization today is bureaucratic rational—regularized, codified and rational. it is common to all modern regimes of political power and frames the transition from classical sovereignty to what david held describes as the second regime of sovereignty—liberal international sovereignty.[1]

  • definition
  • technique
  • themes
  • regional views
  • stakeholders' views
  • proposals
  • academic tool or discipline
  • context
  • issues
  • global governance failure
  • studies of global governance
  • see also
  • notes
  • external links

Global governance or world governance is a movement towards political cooperation among transnational actors, aimed at negotiating responses to problems that affect more than one state or region. Institutions of global governance—the United Nations, the International Criminal Court, the World Bank, etc.—tend to have limited or demarcated Global governance involves multiple states including international organizations with one state having more of a lead role than the rest. The modern question of world governance exists in the context of globalization and globalizing regimes of power: politically, economically and culturally. In response to the acceleration of worldwide interdependence, both between human societies and between humankind and the biosphere, the term "global governance" may name the process of designating laws, rules, or regulations intended for a global scale.

Global governance is not a singular system. There is no "world government" but the many different regimes of global governance do have commonalities:

While the contemporary system of global political relations is not integrated, the relation between the various regimes of global governance is not insignificant, and the system does have a common dominant organizational form. The dominant mode of organization today is bureaucratic rational—regularized, codified and rational. It is common to all modern regimes of political power and frames the transition from classical sovereignty to what David Held describes as the second regime of sovereignty—liberal international sovereignty.[1]