Distributism

  • distributism is an economic theory asserting that the world's productive assets should be widely owned rather than concentrated.[1]

    developed in europe in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, distributism was based upon the principles of catholic social teaching, especially the teachings of pope leo xiii in his encyclical rerum novarum (1891) and pope pius xi in quadragesimo anno (1931).[2][3][4] it views both capitalism and socialism as equally flawed and exploitative, and it favors economic mechanisms such as cooperatives and member-owned mutual organizations as well as small businesses, and large-scale antitrust regulations.

    some christian democratic political parties have advocated distributism in their economic policies.

  • overview
  • background
  • position within the political spectrum
  • economic theory
  • social theory
  • geopolitical theory
  • influence
  • notable distributists
  • key texts
  • see also
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

Distributism is an economic theory asserting that the world's productive assets should be widely owned rather than concentrated.[1]

Developed in Europe in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, distributism was based upon the principles of Catholic social teaching, especially the teachings of Pope Leo XIII in his encyclical Rerum novarum (1891) and Pope Pius XI in Quadragesimo anno (1931).[2][3][4] It views both capitalism and socialism as equally flawed and exploitative, and it favors economic mechanisms such as cooperatives and member-owned mutual organizations as well as small businesses, and large-scale antitrust regulations.

Some Christian democratic political parties have advocated distributism in their economic policies.