Dictatorship of the proletariat

  • in marxist philosophy, the dictatorship of the proletariat is a state of affairs in which the working class hold political power.[1][2] proletarian dictatorship is the intermediate stage between a capitalist economy and a communist economy, whereby the government nationalises ownership of the means of production from private to collective ownership.[3]

    the socialist revolutionary joseph weydemeyer coined the term "dictatorship of the proletariat", which karl marx and friedrich engels adopted to their philosophy and economics. the term "dictatorship" indicates the retention of the state apparatus, but differs from individual dictatorship, the rule of one man. the term dictatorship of the proletariat implies the complete "socialization of the major means of production",[4] the planning of material production in service to the social and economic needs of the population, such as the right to work, education, health and welfare services, public housing.

    the paris commune (1871), which controlled the capital city for two months, before being suppressed, was an example of the dictatorship of the proletariat. in marxist philosophy, the term "dictatorship of the bourgeoisie" is the antonym to "dictatorship of the proletariat".[5]

    there are multiple popular trends for this political thought, all of which believe the state will be retained post-revolution for its enforcement capabilities:

    • marxism–leninism follows the ideas of marxism and leninism as interpreted by vladimir lenin's successor joseph stalin. it seeks to organise a vanguard party, as advocated by marx, and to lead a proletarian uprising, to assume state power on behalf of the proletariat and to construct a single-party "socialist state" representing a dictatorship of the proletariat, governed through the process of democratic centralism, which lenin described as "diversity in discussion, unity in action". marxism–leninism forms the official ideology of the ruling parties of china, cuba, laos and vietnam, and was the official ideology of the communist party of the soviet union from the late 1920s, and later of the other ruling parties making up the eastern bloc.
    • libertarian marxists criticize marxism–leninism for perceived differences from orthodox marxism, opposing the leninist principle of democratic centralism and the marxist–leninist interpretation of vanguardism. along with trotskyists, they also oppose the use of a one-party state which they view as inherently undemocratic, although trotskyists are still bolsheviks, subscribing to democratic centralism and soviet democracy, seeing their ideology as a more accurate interpretation of leninism. rosa luxemburg, a marxist theorist, emphasized the role of the vanguard party as representative of the whole class[6][7], and the dictatorship of the proletariat as the entire proletariat's rule, characterizing the dictatorship of the proletariat as a concept meant to expand democracy rather than reduce it - as opposed to minority rule in the dictatorship of the bourgeoisie.[8]

    in the road to serfdom (1944), the economist friedrich hayek wrote that the dictatorship of the proletariat likely would destroy personal freedom as completely as does an autocracy.[9] the european commission of human rights found pursuing the dictatorship of the proletariat incompatible with the european convention on human rights in communist party of germany v. the federal republic of germany (1957).[10]

  • theoretical approaches
  • vladimir lenin
  • see also
  • references
  • external links

In Marxist philosophy, the dictatorship of the proletariat is a state of affairs in which the working class hold political power.[1][2] Proletarian dictatorship is the intermediate stage between a capitalist economy and a communist economy, whereby the government nationalises ownership of the means of production from private to collective ownership.[3]

The socialist revolutionary Joseph Weydemeyer coined the term "dictatorship of the proletariat", which Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels adopted to their philosophy and economics. The term "dictatorship" indicates the retention of the state apparatus, but differs from individual dictatorship, the rule of one man. The term dictatorship of the proletariat implies the complete "socialization of the major means of production",[4] the planning of material production in service to the social and economic needs of the population, such as the right to work, education, health and welfare services, public housing.

The Paris Commune (1871), which controlled the capital city for two months, before being suppressed, was an example of the dictatorship of the proletariat. In Marxist philosophy, the term "Dictatorship of the bourgeoisie" is the antonym to "dictatorship of the proletariat".[5]

There are multiple popular trends for this political thought, all of which believe the state will be retained post-revolution for its enforcement capabilities:

  • Marxism–Leninism follows the ideas of Marxism and Leninism as interpreted by Vladimir Lenin's successor Joseph Stalin. It seeks to organise a vanguard party, as advocated by Marx, and to lead a proletarian uprising, to assume state power on behalf of the proletariat and to construct a single-party "socialist state" representing a dictatorship of the proletariat, governed through the process of democratic centralism, which Lenin described as "diversity in discussion, unity in action". Marxism–Leninism forms the official ideology of the ruling parties of China, Cuba, Laos and Vietnam, and was the official ideology of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union from the late 1920s, and later of the other ruling parties making up the Eastern Bloc.
  • Libertarian Marxists criticize Marxism–Leninism for perceived differences from orthodox Marxism, opposing the Leninist principle of democratic centralism and the Marxist–Leninist interpretation of vanguardism. Along with Trotskyists, they also oppose the use of a one-party state which they view as inherently undemocratic, although Trotskyists are still Bolsheviks, subscribing to democratic centralism and soviet democracy, seeing their ideology as a more accurate interpretation of Leninism. Rosa Luxemburg, a Marxist theorist, emphasized the role of the vanguard party as representative of the whole class[6][7], and the dictatorship of the proletariat as the entire proletariat's rule, characterizing the dictatorship of the proletariat as a concept meant to expand democracy rather than reduce it - as opposed to minority rule in the dictatorship of the bourgeoisie.[8]

In The Road to Serfdom (1944), the economist Friedrich Hayek wrote that the dictatorship of the proletariat likely would destroy personal freedom as completely as does an autocracy.[9] The European Commission of Human Rights found pursuing the dictatorship of the proletariat incompatible with the European Convention on Human Rights in Communist Party of Germany v. the Federal Republic of Germany (1957).[10]