Cypriot Greek

  • cypriot greek
    κυπριακή ελληνική
    pronunciation[cipɾiaˈci elːiniˈci]
    native tocyprus
    ethnicitygreek cypriots
    native speakers
    c. 700,000 in cyprus (2011)[1][note 1]
    language family
    indo-european
    • greek
      • atticionic
        • cypriot greek
    writing system
    greek alphabet
    language codes
    iso 639-3
    cypr1249[2]
    linguasphere56-aaa-ahg
    this article contains ipa phonetic symbols. without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of unicode characters. for an introductory guide on ipa symbols, see help:ipa.

    cypriot greek (greek: κυπριακά ελληνικά or κυπριακά) is the variety of modern greek that is spoken by the majority of the cypriot populace and greek cypriot diaspora. it is considered a divergent variety as it differs from standard modern greek[note 2] in various aspects of its lexicon,[3] phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and even pragmatics,[4] not only for historical reasons, but also because of geographical isolation, different settlement patterns, and extensive contact with typologically distinct languages.[5]

  • classification
  • phonology
  • grammar
  • vocabulary
  • orthography
  • history
  • see also
  • footnotes
  • bibliography
  • further reading

Cypriot Greek
κυπριακή ελληνική
Pronunciation[cipɾiaˈci elːiniˈci]
Native toCyprus
EthnicityGreek Cypriots
Native speakers
c. 700,000 in Cyprus (2011)[1][note 1]
Greek alphabet
Language codes
ISO 639-3
cypr1249[2]
Linguasphere56-AAA-ahg
This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.

Cypriot Greek (Greek: κυπριακά ελληνικά or κυπριακά) is the variety of Modern Greek that is spoken by the majority of the Cypriot populace and Greek Cypriot diaspora. It is considered a divergent variety as it differs from Standard Modern Greek[note 2] in various aspects of its lexicon,[3] phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and even pragmatics,[4] not only for historical reasons, but also because of geographical isolation, different settlement patterns, and extensive contact with typologically distinct languages.[5]