Corruption in Yemen

  • corruption in yemen is a highly serious problem. yemen is the most corrupt country in the gulf region.[1] it is also the poorest country in the middle east, "with an exceptionally high birth rate, acute rates of child malnutrition and rapidly dwindling reserves of oil and water." in yemen, according to chatham house, "corruption, poverty and inequality are systemic";[2] in the words of the carnegie endowment for international peace, corrupt activity is "so entrenched and pervasive" that many citizens feel powerless.[3]

    absent any "system of control and accountability," corruption is now present throughout the public and private spheres, so much so that in the words of the world bank, "[c]orruption and patronage networks are running the country's public affairs." this ubiquitous corruption has resulted in weak government and "corrupt power blocs that control public resources." as a consequence of civil-service corruption, there are large numbers of so-called ghost workers. corruption in the energy, communications, and health and education sectors have resulted in inadequate service or no service at all.[1]

    jane marriott, britain's ambassador to yemen, stated in december 2013 that corruption in yemen was so pervasive that it was credibly undermining the security and economy of the nation. she also noted that institutionalized corruption of such a grand scale discourages development and innovation.[4]

    as of 2018, transparency international's corruption perception index ranks the country 176th place out of 180 countries.[5]

  • background
  • government
  • business
  • economic growth
  • anti-corruption activities
  • references
  • external links

Corruption in Yemen is a highly serious problem. Yemen is the most corrupt country in the Gulf region.[1] It is also the poorest country in the Middle East, "with an exceptionally high birth rate, acute rates of child malnutrition and rapidly dwindling reserves of oil and water." In Yemen, according to Chatham House, "corruption, poverty and inequality are systemic";[2] in the words of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, corrupt activity is "so entrenched and pervasive" that many citizens feel powerless.[3]

Absent any "system of control and accountability," corruption is now present throughout the public and private spheres, so much so that in the words of the World Bank, "[c]orruption and patronage networks are running the country's public affairs." This ubiquitous corruption has resulted in weak government and "corrupt power blocs that control public resources." As a consequence of civil-service corruption, there are large numbers of so-called ghost workers. Corruption in the energy, communications, and health and education sectors have resulted in inadequate service or no service at all.[1]

Jane Marriott, Britain's Ambassador to Yemen, stated in December 2013 that corruption in Yemen was so pervasive that it was credibly undermining the security and economy of the nation. She also noted that institutionalized corruption of such a grand scale discourages development and innovation.[4]

As of 2018, Transparency International's Corruption Perception Index ranks the country 176th place out of 180 countries.[5]