Corruption in Canada

  • transparency international's 2016 corruption perception index ranks canada as the 9th least corrupt nation out of 176 countries, and the least corrupt nation in the americas.[1] however, in recent years[when?] corruption has been an increasingly large problem in government, industry and non-governmental organizations. for instance, in 2013, the world bank blacklisted snc-lavalin and its subsidiaries from "bidding on its global projects under its fraud and corruption policy" due to the padma bridge scandal.[2] canada also ranks at the bottom of the bribery-fighting rankings, "with little or no enforcement of anti-bribery measures".[3] the 2014 ernst & young global fraud survey found that "twenty percent of canadian executives believe bribery and corruption are widespread in this country".[4] according to a study by the graduate school of public policy at the university of saskatchewan, "a large proportion of canadians see their politicians and their institutions as fundamentally corrupt".[5]

  • corruption by region
  • corruption by sector
  • government and civil service
  • notable corruption cases
  • anti-corruption mechanisms
  • see also
  • references
  • external links

Transparency International's 2016 Corruption Perception Index ranks Canada as the 9th least corrupt nation out of 176 countries, and the least corrupt nation in the Americas.[1] However, in recent years[when?] corruption has been an increasingly large problem in government, industry and non-governmental organizations. For instance, in 2013, the World Bank blacklisted SNC-Lavalin and its subsidiaries from "bidding on its global projects under its fraud and corruption policy" due to the Padma Bridge scandal.[2] Canada also ranks at the bottom of the bribery-fighting rankings, "with little or no enforcement of anti-bribery measures".[3] The 2014 Ernst & Young global fraud survey found that "twenty percent of Canadian executives believe bribery and corruption are widespread in this country".[4] According to a study by the Graduate School of Public Policy at the University of Saskatchewan, "a large proportion of Canadians see their politicians and their institutions as fundamentally corrupt".[5]