Commune

  • members of the anabaptist christian bruderhof communities live, eat, work and worship communally
    young musicians living in a shared community in amsterdam

    a commune (the french word appearing in the 12th century from communia, meaning a large gathering of people sharing a common life; from latin communis, things held in common)[1] is an intentional community of people living together, sharing common interests, often having common values and beliefs, as well as shared property, possessions, resources, and, in some communes, work, income or assets.[2]

    in addition to the communal economy, consensus decision-making, non-hierarchical structures and ecological living have become important core principles for many communes. there are many contemporary intentional communities all over the world, a list of which can be found at the fellowship for intentional community (fic).[3]

  • categorization of communities
  • core principles of communes
  • communes around the world
  • see also
  • references
  • sources
  • external links

Members of the Anabaptist Christian Bruderhof Communities live, eat, work and worship communally
Young musicians living in a shared community in Amsterdam

A commune (the French word appearing in the 12th century from communia, meaning a large gathering of people sharing a common life; from Latin communis, things held in common)[1] is an intentional community of people living together, sharing common interests, often having common values and beliefs, as well as shared property, possessions, resources, and, in some communes, work, income or assets.[2]

In addition to the communal economy, consensus decision-making, non-hierarchical structures and ecological living have become important core principles for many communes. There are many contemporary intentional communities all over the world, a list of which can be found at the Fellowship for Intentional Community (FIC).[3]