Cabinet of Singapore

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    the cabinet of singapore forms the government (executive branch) of singapore together with the president of singapore. it is led by the prime minister of singapore who is the head of government. the prime minister is a member of parliament (mp) appointed by the president who selects a person that in his or her view is likely to command the confidence of a majority of the parliament of singapore. the other members of the cabinet are ministers who are members of parliament appointed by the president on the prime minister's advice. cabinet members are prohibited from holding any office of profit and from actively engaging in any commercial enterprise.

    the cabinet generally directs and controls the government and is collectively responsible to parliament. it also has significant influence over lawmaking. ministers may be designated by the prime minister to be in charge of particular ministries, or as ministers in the prime minister's office. singapore's ministers are the best paid in the world. prior to a salary review in 2011, the prime minister's annual salary was s$3.07 million, while the pay of ministerial-grade officers ranged between s$1.58 million and s$2.37 million.[1] on 21 may 2011, a committee was appointed by the prime minister to review the salaries of the prime minister as well as the president, political appointment holders, and members of parliament.[2] following the recommended wage reductions by the committee which were then debated and subsequently accepted in parliament, the prime minister's salary was reduced by 36% (includes the removal of his pension) to s$2.2 million (then about us$1.7 million).[1] nonetheless, the prime minister remains the highest-paid political leader in the world.[3]

    the earliest predecessor of the cabinet was the executive council of the straits settlements, introduced in 1877 to advise the governor of the straits settlements. it wielded no executive power. in 1955, a council of ministers was created, made up of three ex officio official members and six elected members of the legislative assembly of singapore, appointed by the governor on the recommendation of the leader of the house. following the general elections that year, david saul marshall became the first chief minister of singapore. constitutional talks between legislative assembly representatives and the colonial office were held from 1956 to 1958, and singapore gained full internal self-government in 1959. the governor was replaced by the yang di-pertuan negara, who had power to appoint to the post of prime minister the person most likely to command the authority of the assembly, and other ministers of the cabinet on the prime minister's advice. in the 1959 general elections, the people's action party swept to power with 43 out of the 51 seats in the assembly, and lee kuan yew became the first prime minister of singapore. the executive branch of the singapore government remained unchanged following singapore's merger with malaysia in 1963, and subsequent independence in 1965.

    following the 2011 general election, a cabinet reshuffle took place effective 21 may 2011. lim hng kiang and lim swee say respectively retained their trade and industry and prime minister's office portfolios, while other ministers were given new appointments to the remaining 11 ministries. heng swee keat and chan chun sing, both elected to parliament for the first time, were respectively assigned the posts of minister for education, and acting minister for community development, youth and sports.

    a cabinet reshuffle took place in may 2018 with the stated purpose was to better prepare for a leadership transition to the "4g" leaders, minister for trade and industry (trade) lim hng kiang, minister for manpower lim swee say, and minister for communications and information yaacob ibrahim all retired and were succeeded by chan chun sing, josephine teo, and s. iswaran respectively all of whom had previously held other cabinet appointments.[4]

  • history
  • structure of government
  • responsibilities and remuneration
  • current cabinet
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

Coat of arms of Singapore.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Singapore
Constitution
Flag of Singapore.svg Singapore portal

The Cabinet of Singapore forms the Government (executive branch) of Singapore together with the President of Singapore. It is led by the Prime Minister of Singapore who is the head of government. The Prime Minister is a Member of Parliament (MP) appointed by the President who selects a person that in his or her view is likely to command the confidence of a majority of the Parliament of Singapore. The other members of the Cabinet are Ministers who are Members of Parliament appointed by the President on the Prime Minister's advice. Cabinet members are prohibited from holding any office of profit and from actively engaging in any commercial enterprise.

The Cabinet generally directs and controls the Government and is collectively responsible to Parliament. It also has significant influence over lawmaking. Ministers may be designated by the Prime Minister to be in charge of particular ministries, or as Ministers in the Prime Minister's Office. Singapore's ministers are the best paid in the world. Prior to a salary review in 2011, the Prime Minister's annual salary was S$3.07 million, while the pay of ministerial-grade officers ranged between S$1.58 million and S$2.37 million.[1] On 21 May 2011, a committee was appointed by the Prime Minister to review the salaries of the Prime Minister as well as the President, political appointment holders, and Members of Parliament.[2] Following the recommended wage reductions by the committee which were then debated and subsequently accepted in Parliament, the Prime Minister's salary was reduced by 36% (includes the removal of his pension) to S$2.2 million (then about US$1.7 million).[1] Nonetheless, the Prime Minister remains the highest-paid political leader in the world.[3]

The earliest predecessor of the Cabinet was the Executive Council of the Straits Settlements, introduced in 1877 to advise the Governor of the Straits Settlements. It wielded no executive power. In 1955, a Council of Ministers was created, made up of three ex officio Official Members and six Elected Members of the Legislative Assembly of Singapore, appointed by the Governor on the recommendation of the Leader of the House. Following the general elections that year, David Saul Marshall became the first Chief Minister of Singapore. Constitutional talks between Legislative Assembly representatives and the Colonial Office were held from 1956 to 1958, and Singapore gained full internal self-government in 1959. The Governor was replaced by the Yang di-Pertuan Negara, who had power to appoint to the post of Prime Minister the person most likely to command the authority of the Assembly, and other Ministers of the Cabinet on the Prime Minister's advice. In the 1959 general elections, the People's Action Party swept to power with 43 out of the 51 seats in the Assembly, and Lee Kuan Yew became the first Prime Minister of Singapore. The executive branch of the Singapore Government remained unchanged following Singapore's merger with Malaysia in 1963, and subsequent independence in 1965.

Following the 2011 general election, a Cabinet reshuffle took place effective 21 May 2011. Lim Hng Kiang and Lim Swee Say respectively retained their Trade and Industry and Prime Minister's Office portfolios, while other ministers were given new appointments to the remaining 11 ministries. Heng Swee Keat and Chan Chun Sing, both elected to Parliament for the first time, were respectively assigned the posts of Minister for Education, and Acting Minister for Community Development, Youth and Sports.

A Cabinet Reshuffle took place in May 2018 with the stated purpose was to better prepare for a leadership transition to the "4G" leaders, Minister for Trade and Industry (Trade) Lim Hng Kiang, Minister for Manpower Lim Swee Say, and Minister for Communications and Information Yaacob Ibrahim all retired and were succeeded by Chan Chun Sing, Josephine Teo, and S. Iswaran respectively all of whom had previously held other cabinet appointments.[4]