British and Foreign Unitarian Association

British and Foreign Unitarian Association
AbbreviationBFUA; the Unitarians
Formation26 May 1825 as an amalgamation of the Unitarian Book Society for literature, The Unitarian Fund for mission work, and the Unitarian Association for civil rights
Extinction1928 by becoming part of the General Assembly of Unitarian and Free Christian Churches
Typereligious organization
HeadquartersLondon, United Kingdom
Location
  • United Kingdom

The British and Foreign Unitarian Association was the major Unitarian body in Britain from 1825. The BFUA was founded as an amalgamation of three older societies: the Unitarian Book Society for literature (1791), The Unitarian Fund for mission work (1806), and the Unitarian Association for civil rights (1818 or 1819). Its offices were shared with the Sunday School Association at Essex Street, on the site of England's first Unitarian church. In 1928 the BFUA became part of the General Assembly of Unitarian and Free Christian Churches, still the umbrella organisation for British Unitarianism, which has its headquarters, Essex Hall, in the same place in central London.

Dates

The British and Foreign Unitarian Association was founded on 26 May 1825, at a meeting chaired by Thomas Gibson, father of Thomas Field Gibson.[1] This was the same day as the American Unitarian Association was formed. (The AUA is one of two bodies that merged in 1961 to form the Unitarian Universalist Association.) The History of Essex Hall, written in 1959 by Mortimer Rowe, the Secretary (i.e. chief executive) of the General Assembly for its first twenty years, claims this was entirely coincidental.[2][3]