Bosnian language

  • bosnian
    bosanski / босански
    pronunciation[bɔ̌sanskiː]
    native tobosnia
    ethnicitybosniaks
    bosnians[a]
    native speakers
    2.5–3 million (2008)[1]
    language family
    indo-european
    • balto-slavic
      • slavic
        • south slavic
          • western
            • serbo-croatian
              • bosnian
    writing system
    latin (gaj's alphabet)
    cyrillic (vuk's alphabet)[note 1]
    yugoslav braille
    formerly:
    arabic (arebica)
    bosnian cyrillic (bosančica)
    official status
    official language in
     bosnia and herzegovina
     montenegro (co-official)
    recognised minority
    language in
     serbia
     croatia
     north macedonia
     slovenia
     turkey
     albania
     kosovo
    [a]
    language codes
    bs
    bos
    iso 639-3bos
    bosn1245[3]
    linguaspherepart of 53-aaa-g
    this article contains ipa phonetic symbols. without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of unicode characters. for an introductory guide on ipa symbols, see help:ipa.

    the bosnian language (n/ (about this soundlisten); bosanski / босански [bɔ̌sanskiː]) is the standardized variety of serbo-croatian mainly used by bosniaks.[4][5][6] bosnian is one of three such varieties considered official languages of bosnia and herzegovina,[7] along with croatian and serbian. it is also an officially recognized minority language in serbia,[8] montenegro,[9] north macedonia and kosovo.[10][a]

    bosnian uses both the latin and cyrillic alphabets,[note 1] with latin in everyday use.[11] it is notable among the varieties of serbo-croatian for a number of arabic, ottoman turkish and persian loanwords, largely due to the language's interaction with those cultures through islamic ties.[12][13][14]

    bosnian is based on the most widespread dialect of serbo-croatian, shtokavian, more specifically on eastern herzegovinian, which is also the basis of standard croatian, serbian, and montenegrin varieties. therefore, the declaration on the common language of, croats, serbs, bosniaks and montenegrins was issued in 2017 in sarajevo.[15][16] until the 1990s, the common language was called serbo-croatian[17] and that term is still used in english, along with "bosnian-croatian-montenegrin-serbian" (bcms), especially in diplomatic circles.

  • history
  • differences between bosnian, croatian and serbian
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • further reading
  • external links

Bosnian
bosanski / босански
Pronunciation[bɔ̌sanskiː]
Native toBosnia
EthnicityBosniaks
Bosnians[a]
Native speakers
2.5–3 million (2008)[1]
Latin (Gaj's alphabet)
Cyrillic (Vuk's alphabet)[Note 1]
Yugoslav Braille
Formerly:
Arabic (Arebica)
Bosnian Cyrillic (Bosančica)
Official status
Official language in
 Bosnia and Herzegovina
 Montenegro (co-official)
Recognised minority
language in
Language codes
bs
bos
ISO 639-3bos
bosn1245[3]
Linguaspherepart of 53-AAA-g
This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.

The Bosnian language (n/ (About this soundlisten); bosanski / босански [bɔ̌sanskiː]) is the standardized variety of Serbo-Croatian mainly used by Bosniaks.[4][5][6] Bosnian is one of three such varieties considered official languages of Bosnia and Herzegovina,[7] along with Croatian and Serbian. It is also an officially recognized minority language in Serbia,[8] Montenegro,[9] North Macedonia and Kosovo.[10][a]

Bosnian uses both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets,[Note 1] with Latin in everyday use.[11] It is notable among the varieties of Serbo-Croatian for a number of Arabic, Ottoman Turkish and Persian loanwords, largely due to the language's interaction with those cultures through Islamic ties.[12][13][14]

Bosnian is based on the most widespread dialect of Serbo-Croatian, Shtokavian, more specifically on Eastern Herzegovinian, which is also the basis of standard Croatian, Serbian, and Montenegrin varieties. Therefore, the Declaration on the Common Language of, Croats, Serbs, Bosniaks and Montenegrins was issued in 2017 in Sarajevo.[15][16] Until the 1990s, the common language was called Serbo-Croatian[17] and that term is still used in English, along with "Bosnian-Croatian-Montenegrin-Serbian" (BCMS), especially in diplomatic circles.