Bopomofo

  • bopomofo
    注音符號
    注音符号
    (ㄅㄆㄇㄈ)
    zhuyinbaike.svg
    百科全書 百科全书 (encyclopedia) in zhuyin fuhao
    type
    semisyllabary (letters for onsets and rhymes; diacritics for tones)
    creatorcommission on the unification of pronunciation
    introduced by the beiyang government of the republic of china
    time period
    1918[1] to 1958 in mainland china (used in a secondary position to hanyu pinyin in all editions of xiandai hanyu cidian from 1960 to present 2016 edition);
    1945 to the present in taiwan
    parent systems
    oracle bone script
    • seal script
      • clerical script
        • bopomofo
          注音符號
          注音符号
          (ㄅㄆㄇㄈ)
    child systems
    taiwanese phonetic symbols, suzhou phonetic symbols, hmu phonetic symbols
    sister systems
    simplified chinese, kanji, hanja, chữ nôm, khitan script
    directionleft-to-right
    iso 15924bopo, 285
    unicode alias
    bopomofo
    u+31a0–u+31bf bopomofo extended
    mandarin phonetic symbol
    traditional chinese注音符號
    simplified chinese注音符号

    bopomofo, also called zhuyin (chinese: 注音) or mandarin phonetic symbols, is the major chinese transliteration system for mandarin chinese and other related languages and dialects which is nowadays most commonly used in taiwanese mandarin. it is also used to transcribe other varieties of chinese, particularly other varieties of standard chinese and related mandarin dialects, as well as taiwanese hokkien.

    zhuyin fuhao and zhuyin are traditional terms, whereas bopomofo is the colloquial term, also used by the iso and unicode. consisting of 37 characters and four tone marks, it transcribes all possible sounds in mandarin. zhuyin was introduced in china by the republican government in the 1910s and used alongside the wade–giles system, which used a modified latin alphabet. the wade system was replaced by hanyu pinyin in 1958 by the government of the people's republic of china,[2] and at the international organization for standardization (iso) in 1982.[3] bopomofo is an official transliteration system in taiwan, being used in guoyu jianbian cidian, guoyu chongbian cidian and other documents. it is widely used as the main electronic input method for mandarin chinese in taiwan (roc). taiwan adopted hanyu pinyin as one of the official romanization systems for mandarin chinese in 2009,[4] but the system is not commonly used in electronic input.

  • name
  • history
  • etymology
  • writing
  • comparison
  • use outside standard mandarin
  • computer uses
  • see also
  • references
  • external links

Bopomofo
注音符號
注音符号
(ㄅㄆㄇㄈ)
Zhuyinbaike.svg
百科全書 百科全书 (encyclopedia) in Zhuyin Fuhao
Type
Semisyllabary (letters for onsets and rhymes; diacritics for tones)
CreatorCommission on the Unification of Pronunciation
Introduced by the Beiyang government of the Republic of China
Time period
1918[1] to 1958 in mainland China (used in a secondary position to Hanyu Pinyin in all editions of Xiandai Hanyu Cidian from 1960 to present 2016 edition);
1945 to the present in Taiwan
Parent systems
Oracle Bone Script
Child systems
Taiwanese Phonetic Symbols, Suzhou Phonetic Symbols, Hmu Phonetic Symbols
Sister systems
Simplified Chinese, Kanji, Hanja, Chữ Nôm, Khitan script
DirectionLeft-to-right
ISO 15924Bopo, 285
Unicode alias
Bopomofo
U+31A0–U+31BF Bopomofo Extended
Mandarin Phonetic Symbol
Traditional Chinese注音符號
Simplified Chinese注音符号

Bopomofo, also called Zhuyin (Chinese: 注音) or Mandarin Phonetic Symbols, is the major Chinese transliteration system for Mandarin Chinese and other related languages and dialects which is nowadays most commonly used in Taiwanese Mandarin. It is also used to transcribe other varieties of Chinese, particularly other varieties of Standard Chinese and related Mandarin dialects, as well as Taiwanese Hokkien.

Zhuyin Fuhao and Zhuyin are traditional terms, whereas Bopomofo is the colloquial term, also used by the ISO and Unicode. Consisting of 37 characters and four tone marks, it transcribes all possible sounds in Mandarin. Zhuyin was introduced in China by the Republican Government in the 1910s and used alongside the Wade–Giles system, which used a modified Latin alphabet. The Wade system was replaced by Hanyu Pinyin in 1958 by the Government of the People's Republic of China,[2] and at the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) in 1982.[3] Bopomofo is an official transliteration system in Taiwan, being used in Guoyu Jianbian Cidian, Guoyu Chongbian Cidian and other documents. It is widely used as the main electronic input method for Mandarin Chinese in Taiwan (ROC). Taiwan adopted Hanyu Pinyin as one of the official romanization systems for Mandarin Chinese in 2009,[4] but the system is not commonly used in electronic input.