2017 Catalan regional election

  • 2017 catalan regional election

    ← 2015 21 december 2017 next →
    elected members →

    all 135 seats in the parliament of catalonia
    68 seats needed for a majority
    opinion polls
    registered5,554,455 green arrow up darker.svg0.8%
    turnout4,392,891 (79.1%)
    green arrow up darker.svg4.1 pp
      first party second party third party
      inés arrimadas 2017b (cropped).jpg carles puigdemont 2017 (cropped).jpg oriol junqueras 2016b (cropped).jpg
    leader inés arrimadas carles puigdemont[a] oriol junqueras[a]
    party cs juntsxcat erc–catsí
    leader since 3 july 2015 13 november 2017 17 september 2011
    leader's seat barcelona barcelona barcelona
    last election 25 seats, 17.9% 31 seats (jxsí)[b] 26 seats (jxsí)[b]
    seats won 36 34 32
    seat change green arrow up darker.svg11 green arrow up darker.svg3 green arrow up darker.svg6
    popular vote 1,109,732 948,233 935,861
    percentage 25.4% 21.7% 21.4%
    swing green arrow up darker.svg7.5 pp n/a n/a

      fourth party fifth party sixth party
      miquel iceta 2015a (cropped).jpg xavier domènech 2015b (cropped).jpg carles riera 2017 (cropped).jpg
    leader miquel iceta xavier domènech carles riera
    party psc–psoe catcomú–podem cup
    leader since 19 july 2014 8 april 2017 15 november 2017
    leader's seat barcelona barcelona barcelona
    last election 16 seats, 12.7% 11 seats, 8.9%[c] 10 seats, 8.2%
    seats won 17 8 4
    seat change green arrow up darker.svg1 red arrow down.svg3 red arrow down.svg6
    popular vote 606,659 326,360 195,246
    percentage 13.9% 7.5% 4.5%
    swing green arrow up darker.svg1.2 pp red arrow down.svg1.4 pp red arrow down.svg3.7 pp

      seventh party
      xavier garcía albiol 2017 (cropped).jpg
    leader xavier garcía albiol
    party pp
    leader since 28 july 2015
    leader's seat barcelona
    last election 11 seats, 8.5%
    seats won 4
    seat change red arrow down.svg7
    popular vote 185,670
    percentage 4.2%
    swing red arrow down.svg4.3 pp

    cataloniaprovincemapparliament2017.png
    constituency results map for the parliament of catalonia

    president before election

    office suspended
    (previously carles puigdemont (pdecat))

    elected president

    quim torra
    independent (juntsxcat)

    the 2017 catalan regional election was held on thursday, 21 december 2017 to elect the 12th parliament of the autonomous community of catalonia. all 135 seats in the parliament were up for election. the election was called by spanish prime minister mariano rajoy after the invocation of article 155 of the 1978 spanish constitution to enforce direct rule in catalonia and the subsequent dismissal of the catalan government under president carles puigdemont.[1] the three pro-catalan independence parties won a slim majority of parliamentary seats, claiming 70 out of 135, but fell short of a majority in the popular vote by securing 47.6% of the share.

    pro-catalan independence parties maintained their parliamentary majority at the 2015 election, although then-president artur mas and his junts pel sí (jxsí) coalition—made up primarily by democratic convergence of catalonia (cdc) and republican left of catalonia (erc)—required from the support from popular unity candidacy (cup) to govern. the cup's decision to vote against mas's led to his witdrawal and to the election of carles puigdemont, until then mayor of girona, as leader of a cdc–erc coalition government.[2] shortly thereafter, cdc was re-founded as catalan european democratic party (pdecat).[3]

    on 27 october 2017, following the controversial referendum on 1 october, the pro-independence majority in the catalan parliament voted in favour of a unilateral declaration of independence, just hours before the spanish senate voted to invoke article 155 of the spanish constitution.[4][5] this allowed prime minister mariano rajoy to sack the catalan government and dissolve the catalan parliament, calling a regional election for 21 december.[6][1] with 36 seats, the main anti-independence party, citizens (cs), emerged as the largest in the parliament.[7] the socialists' party of catalonia (psc) performed well below expectations and increased its seat count by one,[8] whereas catalunya en comú–podem, a left-wing party in favor of self-governance for the region but not siding itself with either bloc, received 7.5% of the vote and 8 seats. owing to the combined performance of puigdemont's junts per catalunya (juntsxcat) and erc, parties in support of independence maintained their majority in the election,[9] meaning that it was mathematically possible for a pro-independence coalition government to return to power,[10] despite their overall majority having been reduced by two seats.[11]

    the biggest election loser was rajoy's people's party (pp), whose electoral collapse—reduced to 4.2% of the share and 4 out of 135 seats—meant it would be unable to form a parliamentary group of its own in the catalan parliament for the first time in history.[12] the scale of pp's downfall, coupled with the success of cs, threatened to have a political impact beyond catalonia, with pp leaders fearing it could spell the end of the party's hegemony over the centre-right vote in spain.[13][14]

  • overview
  • background
  • parliamentary status
  • parties and candidates
  • campaign
  • opinion polls
  • results
  • aftermath
  • notes
  • references

2017 Catalan regional election

← 2015 21 December 2017 Next →

All 135 seats in the Parliament of Catalonia
68 seats needed for a majority
Opinion polls
Registered5,554,455 Green Arrow Up Darker.svg0.8%
Turnout4,392,891 (79.1%)
Green Arrow Up Darker.svg4.1 pp
  First party Second party Third party
  Inés Arrimadas 2017b (cropped).jpg Carles Puigdemont 2017 (cropped).jpg Oriol Junqueras 2016b (cropped).jpg
Leader Inés Arrimadas Carles Puigdemont[a] Oriol Junqueras[a]
Party Cs JuntsxCat ERC–CatSí
Leader since 3 July 2015 13 November 2017 17 September 2011
Leader's seat Barcelona Barcelona Barcelona
Last election 25 seats, 17.9% 31 seats (JxSí)[b] 26 seats (JxSí)[b]
Seats won 36 34 32
Seat change Green Arrow Up Darker.svg11 Green Arrow Up Darker.svg3 Green Arrow Up Darker.svg6
Popular vote 1,109,732 948,233 935,861
Percentage 25.4% 21.7% 21.4%
Swing Green Arrow Up Darker.svg7.5 pp n/a n/a

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  Miquel Iceta 2015a (cropped).jpg Xavier Domènech 2015b (cropped).jpg Carles Riera 2017 (cropped).jpg
Leader Miquel Iceta Xavier Domènech Carles Riera
Party PSC–PSOE CatComú–Podem CUP
Leader since 19 July 2014 8 April 2017 15 November 2017
Leader's seat Barcelona Barcelona Barcelona
Last election 16 seats, 12.7% 11 seats, 8.9%[c] 10 seats, 8.2%
Seats won 17 8 4
Seat change Green Arrow Up Darker.svg1 Red Arrow Down.svg3 Red Arrow Down.svg6
Popular vote 606,659 326,360 195,246
Percentage 13.9% 7.5% 4.5%
Swing Green Arrow Up Darker.svg1.2 pp Red Arrow Down.svg1.4 pp Red Arrow Down.svg3.7 pp

  Seventh party
  Xavier García Albiol 2017 (cropped).jpg
Leader Xavier García Albiol
Party PP
Leader since 28 July 2015
Leader's seat Barcelona
Last election 11 seats, 8.5%
Seats won 4
Seat change Red Arrow Down.svg7
Popular vote 185,670
Percentage 4.2%
Swing Red Arrow Down.svg4.3 pp

CataloniaProvinceMapParliament2017.png
Constituency results map for the Parliament of Catalonia

President before election

Office suspended
(previously Carles Puigdemont (PDeCAT))

Elected President

Quim Torra
Independent (JuntsxCat)

The 2017 Catalan regional election was held on Thursday, 21 December 2017 to elect the 12th Parliament of the autonomous community of Catalonia. All 135 seats in the Parliament were up for election. The election was called by Spanish prime minister Mariano Rajoy after the invocation of Article 155 of the 1978 Spanish Constitution to enforce direct rule in Catalonia and the subsequent dismissal of the Catalan government under President Carles Puigdemont.[1] The three pro-Catalan independence parties won a slim majority of parliamentary seats, claiming 70 out of 135, but fell short of a majority in the popular vote by securing 47.6% of the share.

Pro-Catalan independence parties maintained their parliamentary majority at the 2015 election, although then-President Artur Mas and his Junts pel Sí (JxSí) coalition—made up primarily by Democratic Convergence of Catalonia (CDC) and Republican Left of Catalonia (ERC)—required from the support from Popular Unity Candidacy (CUP) to govern. The CUP's decision to vote against Mas's led to his witdrawal and to the election of Carles Puigdemont, until then mayor of Girona, as leader of a CDC–ERC coalition government.[2] Shortly thereafter, CDC was re-founded as Catalan European Democratic Party (PDeCAT).[3]

On 27 October 2017, following the controversial referendum on 1 October, the pro-independence majority in the Catalan parliament voted in favour of a unilateral declaration of independence, just hours before the Spanish Senate voted to invoke Article 155 of the Spanish Constitution.[4][5] This allowed Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy to sack the Catalan government and dissolve the Catalan parliament, calling a regional election for 21 December.[6][1] With 36 seats, the main anti-independence party, Citizens (Cs), emerged as the largest in the Parliament.[7] The Socialists' Party of Catalonia (PSC) performed well below expectations and increased its seat count by one,[8] whereas Catalunya en Comú–Podem, a left-wing party in favor of self-governance for the region but not siding itself with either bloc, received 7.5% of the vote and 8 seats. Owing to the combined performance of Puigdemont's Junts per Catalunya (JuntsxCat) and ERC, parties in support of independence maintained their majority in the election,[9] meaning that it was mathematically possible for a pro-independence coalition government to return to power,[10] despite their overall majority having been reduced by two seats.[11]

The biggest election loser was Rajoy's People's Party (PP), whose electoral collapse—reduced to 4.2% of the share and 4 out of 135 seats—meant it would be unable to form a parliamentary group of its own in the Catalan parliament for the first time in history.[12] The scale of PP's downfall, coupled with the success of Cs, threatened to have a political impact beyond Catalonia, with PP leaders fearing it could spell the end of the party's hegemony over the centre-right vote in Spain.[13][14]